A pipe burst inside the building, spraying water everywhere. The pipe is the primary damage, and it alone is a headache to get fixed; however, the Excess moisture significantly impacts a structure, leading to multiple secondary issues such as black mold and rot. If an establishment in Tulsa, OK has flood damage, proprietors must act swiftly to reduce secondary conditions. Here are three things owners should understand about the depth of the issue.


1. This Isn’t a Surface Level Problem


In an attempt to clean up, owners tend to grab rags and soapy water; however, this act doesn’t contain the problem. Towels aren’t enough to dry it out. Cleaners aren’t going to eradicate all of the bacteria. People don’t have the time to let it air dry. As the room develops high humidity levels, porous materials create more dampness. The water penetrates deep within the structure and enters the air vents. Rely on industrial dehumidifiers and air movers to control the airflow and room temperature.


2. Fungus Is a Real Possibility


Black mold thrives in damp, dark locations. The flood created the perfect environment to trigger a possible infestation. Spores multiply within one to two days, so owners do not have time to waste if they want to avoid contamination.


3. Reduce Water Levels


Secondary damage is anything that happens as a result of something else. To ensure that the area is restored to proper operating conditions, work with a water restoration company to evaluate the amount of destruction and establish a remediation plan. Specialists concentrate not only on drying but removing soaked fixtures and materials. This act ensures that space has reduced spore levels and dries easier.
Black mold could grow because of a primary plumbing event. Treat water intrusions seriously, airing out space and eliminating pieces that cannot be cleaned. Proactive approaches minimize secondary issues, speeding up repairs and keeping the bills lower.